3 Shocking Reasons the Johnson & Johnson Trial Should Be Front Page News

In February 2016, a jury in Missouri awarded $72 million in damages to the family of an Alabama woman who died from ovarian cancer. The lawsuit claimed her cancer was caused by using Johnson & Johnson’s well-known baby powder and other products with talc.

$72 million is shocking, but even more shocking is that $62 million of that was punitive. This jury wanted vengeance.

You may wonder what in the world would make a jury so angry? Here is what the plaintiff alleged, with evidence put forward at trial. This is all public trial record, although not many people have seen the transcripts:

1) Silencing of the Facts

Multiple scientists warned the company strongly over a long period of time. Internal memos dating back into the 90s make clear Johnson & Johnson knew about the carcinogens in its products for many years.

One researcher warned Johnson & Johnson executives that they would one day sit across a deposition table and be asked if the profits were worth the lives of all the women they killed. Johnson & Johnson responded by threatening some scientists and pressuring others.

2) Targeting of Minority Women

After the company’s consultants warned them of talcum powder’s link to ovarian cancer, Johnson & Johnson deliberately chose to target African American and Hispanic women. The victim in this first case (over 1,200 more are pending) was African American.

3) Treating Lives as a Game

To show exactly how they felt about their consumers and the safety of their product, Johnson & Johnson created a Monopoly board. The board, kept at their offices, outlined how they would reach their sales goals and included getting past government regulations. Two of the spaces on that Monopoly board had a skull and crossbones on them.

A Game for the Victim?

As a talcum powder injury lawyer, I was truly shocked to see the arrogance of these executives. How could they let this happen? Surely they knew how this evidence would make them look at trial.

This was no game of Monopoly for Jackie Fox, the plaintiff who died of her cancer before the trial ended. She was the cousin of Rosa Parks and a foster parent. And she trusted the product and the company that made it.

Getting Justice

Many of you reading this know someone who’s suffered from ovarian cancer and may have no idea it was possibly caused by a corporation’s willful decision to choose its own profits over women’s lives.

If a woman you know has used Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder or shower to shower product and developed ovarian cancer, she may be entitled to compensation.

I am speaking with potential clients now. Please contact me immediately to discuss your case for free.



Darrell Castle is a product liability and dangerous drug attorney based in Memphis, TN. Since 1984, he has helped clients in Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and across the Mid-South get the compensation they deserve.