Are you less likely to be approved for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) if you have a high education?

That’s a good question.

Truly, you’re just as entitled to SSDI with a law degree from Harvard as the person who dropped out of school in 3rd grade. However, with that law degree, you have a much higher ability to either do your job, or find another job you can do.

Let’s look at the flip side.

If you’re a blue collar worker without a college degree who does manual labor for a living and for some extreme reason, you lose your ability to walk and are confined to a wheel-chair for the rest of your life, your ability to adapt to a white collar job isn’t as good as the person above.

Likewise, if I lost my leg and was confined to a wheelchair, I could more than likely do my job without any major complications, just a little adjustment.

Since SSDI is compensation for those unable to work due to a certain injury or disability, the more able you are to work, the more chance there is for your SSDI claim to be denied.

It’s also important to note how age can affect SSDI. The older you are, the more likely you’ll be approved for SSDI, in general.

Why?

Because there’s a shorter period of time you’ll receive SSDI before your social security retirement benefits set in.

If you’ve been denied SSDI, you’re not alone. You could’ve been denied due to:

  • lack of proper medical records
  • you’ve been denied SSDI before
  • failure to follow the doctor’s ordersyou make too much money
  • failure to cooperate with the Social Security Association (SSA)

However, you can appeal the decision and this is where an experienced attorney comes in handy.

If you’ve been denied SSDI and are considering appealing the decision, or if you have any questions, please contact us today, either online or by calling us at (901) 327-1212. The experienced Memphis personal injury attorneys at Darrell Castle & Associates will be ready to speak with you about your situation, free of charge.

Also, please checkout our Survival Guide to The Disability Appeals Process.