Let’s play a numbers game – the number is 90.

90 is the percentage of all nursing homes that cited a deficiency.

90 is also the percentage of US nursing homes with staffing levels too low to provide adequate care.

These alarming statistics were provided in a report, sending signals out to those looking at nursing home options for parents, grandparents and other loved ones.

When we are put in the situation to look at nursing home options for our loved ones, it is a necessity to investigate facilities thoroughly.  Unfortunately, abuse and neglect can be hidden.

The following video is from CBSNews and was released in August.  In multiple nursing home investigations, hidden cameras caught the staff abusing their residents.

 httpv://youtu.be/WJRxjgaG_Vg

In Families for Better Care‘s state report cards, the majority of the Southeast, including Tennessee, received Ds.

From their report, Families for Better Care concluded that staffing directly correlates with the quality of care received.

Alaska, Hawaii and Maine all scored a “superior” grade in all staffing measures. Each of these states ranked among America’s best nursing home states.

Georgia, Louisiana, Tennessee and Texas all had “failing” staffing measures and each scored with a D or an F on the report card.

More alarming statistics –

  • 1 in 3 US nursing homes were cited for violations
  • Of 2,000 interviews of nursing home residents, 44% said they had been abused while 95% said they had been neglected or seen another resident neglected.
  • 50% of nursing home staff admitted to mistreating older patients
  • 17% of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) had pushed, grabbed or shoved nursing home residents
  • 51% of CNAs reported they had yelled at a resident
  • 23% of CNAs had insulted or sworn at a resident

Abusers have too much freedom.  Often, elderly residents are incapable of defending themselves or reporting the abuse.  With resident incapabilities plus a major lack in oversight of the staff, many abusers get away with their actions until it’s too late.

More elderly could see their “golden age” fade quickly.  With the first Baby Boomers turning 65 in 2011, the older population will continue to increase at a high rate for years to come.

We all want the best for our parents, grandparents and other loved ones. It’s not fair that they are being abused by the caretakers that are paid to protect them.

If nursing homes are going to cut necessary costs to make a profit rather than behave ethically and do their job correctly, which is taking care of their elder residents, then they must be held accountable.

If you or someone you care about has been hurt, neglected or abused in a nursing home or elder care facility, please contact us today online or call us at (901) 327-1212.